NASCAR Cars and Technology

Nascar racing experience

NASCAR, or the National Association of Stock Car Racing, was formed in 1948. Since then NASCAR car racing has become a hugely popular spectator sport. Some NASCAR racing venues can hold up to 170,000 spectators in the stands and the infield. NASCAR cars and the whole Nascar racing experience developed as a very localized racing community built by former moonshine runners in the southern U.S.

These days though, the sport has evolved into a high tech team driven endeavor. NASCAR race cars typically reach speeds up around 180 to 200 mph depending on the track and race conditions. As the speed of the NASCAR cars has increased, so to has the technology surrounding the cars.

The racecar drivers experience from 2 to 3 Gs, the measure of force of gravity, on each turn and their vehicles interior gets up to 120 degrees. The drivers race suits and helmets have to account for these conditions. The NASCAR cars have instrument systems that measure everything while its on the track. The technology is critical since the NASCAR cars bodies and engines have to follow specific guidelines so that they are virtually the same.

The team mechanics and engineers look for any way to provide an advantage, such as through tire pressure adjustments, driver hydration, car lubrication and pit stop strategies. The little differences are so critical that one racing team spent over 10 million dollars for motor oil R and D to get an extra 10 horsepower. The NASCAR cars also have to adhere to car body templates that have minimal tolerances.

The NASCAR series of races has established itself as a profitable business as well that can award top dollar to the drivers and teams, thus helping to fund the technology improvements. There can be over 4 million dollars in prize money for each race winner. The teams also get corporate advertising dollars for ad placement on their NASCAR cars. The broadcasts also generate advertising dollars at the tune of half a million dollars per ad for some of the more famous races.

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Alice Stratt

I'm Alice, from Bristol Tennessee, and I love NASCAR. I've never raced myself but I grew up right there off the track, watching my dad race the #94 car and learning how to work on my own engine. Now I'm all grown up and have a shop of my own, but I still help out in the #94 pit for my old man. Want to learn more about NASCAR or auto repair? Read on!