Shopping for a New Vehicle This Holiday Season? Do Your Research

Used cars in charlottesville

There seems to be deals on everything right now. Every day, you see commercials with local store sales, you probably get Emails about restaurant deals, and any store you visit is full of bright sale tags. Even car dealers are offering great deals right now. Most auto dealers are attempted to push out this year?s inventory before they get next year?s inventory in stock. They are required to make additional room on the floor. It is a great time to shop at Chevrolet dealers, but how can you be sure that something is really a great deal, and is not simply advertised falsely to get your attention?

Pay attention to before and after prices

If possible, attempt to track the prices of your Chevrolet dealership. If there is a vehicle that you are interested in, inquire about the out the door price. The out the door price is important because it will be easier to compare the two prices. Check back again on the price after the holiday sale has started. See how much the price has dropped. If the price drop is not significant enough for you, then request additional discounts.

Although most Chevrolet dealers will not reduce the price much, you may be able to get discounts in other ways. Request that the auto group pay your taxes or closing costs. Request a free auto body work consultation on buying a used car. Most Chevrolet dealers will be willing to throw in these little extras in order to gain the sale. These price savings extras may also be the difference that you need to feel like you got a great price. Transaction prices reached a record high in 2014 averaging $32,386 per vehicle, according to a new Edmunds Key Insights report.

Price match at other similar dealerships

Price matching can be a great way to find out how much wiggle room the dealership really has on their price. They may claim that they are already not receiving any profit, but if a nearby auto dealer is able to go much lower, this is likely not true. Even if they are not willing to price match the other dealership, you will have found a better deal on the same vehicle at another place. With 43% of consumers seeing the dealership has a place to learn, more people are learning the importance of visiting local dealerships to gain valuable information.

Get the Kelly Blue Book Value

The Kelly Blue Book is a car valuing book. It allows you to look up specific vehicles and obtain their overall value. The prices depend on the amount of miles on the vehicle, the year of the vehicle, and the condition it is in. Consider all of these factors when determining the Kelly Blue Book value. Also, compare the book value to online sale prices. Although the value in this book is often somewhat close to being accurate, the demand may be lower for this brand, which brings the value temporarily down.

It is also important to keep a vehicle?s extra features in mind when determining the overall value of it. For example, a vehicle that is basic with little extra features is going to be worth less than a vehicle that is fully loaded. According to a J.D. Power 2015 U.S. Tech Choice Study, 40% of drivers describe blind spot detection and prevention features as their most preferred technologies. A vehicle with this specific feature may be worth more to buyers.

Many auto dealerships offer sales and discounts during the holiday season. People are already spending money on many other things during this time, they may also be tempted to purchase a new vehicle. Before running to the local dealership and purchasing a new car that claims to be on sale, do your research. Compare the price to previous non sale prices, research online, look at other dealerships prices, and look up the Kelly Blue Book value. Doing your research prior to shopping will ensure that your receive the best deal for your new vehicle.

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Alice Stratt

I'm Alice, from Bristol Tennessee, and I love NASCAR. I've never raced myself but I grew up right there off the track, watching my dad race the #94 car and learning how to work on my own engine. Now I'm all grown up and have a shop of my own, but I still help out in the #94 pit for my old man. Want to learn more about NASCAR or auto repair? Read on!