The Family Road Trip A Time for Forced Intimacy

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There was a moment in most every child’s life when his family will decide to take a long vacation to another state or somewhere at least 50 miles away. The child might be excited at such an adventure; after all, the child will wonder where they are going, what sights they will see along the way. The child will likely be happy to see another part of the world.

In 2017, 35% of Americans are planning to take a vacation 50 miles or more away from home with two or more immediate family members. And compared to 2016, 10% more families are expected to take road trips in 2017. That’s a big difference and shows that more families are deciding to travel together and achieve some much needed family time.

Families are loath to travel with each other in some cases as traveling can grate on all the family members moods, especially if those family members involve young children who have never traveled before and might possibly have trouble sitting still or not talking for a length of time.

Families who are loath to travel with each other may find that their old battles will resurface in the confines of a vehicle; the brother who will not leave his sister’s toys alone; the sister who is constantly texting and watching loud videos; the parents who bicker over the smallest things and will not stand to be with one another for a long trip.

Families who are loath to travel with each other may find that their problems end up being resolved by the end of the trip. The closeness with which one finds themselves with the other person, the forced intimacy of a trip, can all lead to a positive outcome when it comes to unhealthy relationships getting healthy.

Parents who are fighting constantly can get a reprieve by being close to one another and hashing situations out. They can bicker sure but also share a conversation rather than sit in silence, as cars are perfect on long road trips for long, deep conversations. The forced intimacy will help them grow closer, as old squabbles are put aside.

Children who are forced to sit with one another may have a sort of bonding as well, given the enclosed circumstances. They may be initially unhappy with the situation, them sitting close to one another, but they should be able to talk and interact without the pretext of leaving each other or being mean. They are forced to interact, as with the parents.

Of course, a big issue with taking a big, long road trip is the simple matter of space. A vehicle that gives little space–say, a 2015 Ford Fiesta–may not be the best choice for a long road trip, as the leg space is limited and the parents and children will be cramped within the vehicle.

A bigger vehicle, like an SUV or one sold at a GMC dealer, has the ability to store items that the family decides are important. These are suitcases or camping gear or presents for family or other important items, which can go in the trunk of the car and free up space for the passengers in the front and middle of the vehicles.

A 2016 CarGurus survey found that parents are likely to select a vehicle based on its ability to meet the family’s needs, including transporting kids’ sports equipment (45%), carrying an infant stroller (33%), transporting pets (31%), traveling to a vacation home (29%), and going on a family camping trip (27%).

Having space in a vehicle, for a family, is crucial to being able to do numerous things. If you’re looking for a new vehicle, or one that has a great deal of space, consider going to a GMC dealer. A GMC dealer is under the General Motors company and they specialize in the larger vehicles, like trucks and large SUVs.

A GMC dealer at a GMC dealership can give you options for many of the reasons you want to buy a new vehicle. GMC trucks and GMC cars are known to be dependable. This kind of auto dealer can help add a great deal to your vehicle choices and the pleasantness of your next vacation with the family.

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Alice Stratt

I'm Alice, from Bristol Tennessee, and I love NASCAR. I've never raced myself but I grew up right there off the track, watching my dad race the #94 car and learning how to work on my own engine. Now I'm all grown up and have a shop of my own, but I still help out in the #94 pit for my old man. Want to learn more about NASCAR or auto repair? Read on!