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When You Need Dent Repair on Your Car

An automobile is a complex and expensive machine, and any responsible car owner will know how to get it fixed, tuned, or otherwise taken care of it suffers damage. This may include dent repair at a local auto shop, for example, if the car has dings and dents on its body. A same-day service auto shop may be just what the customer wants, and paintless dent repair may also be an option if so desired. Mobile dent repair can be convenient for some customers, too. And that’s not all. Aside from dent repair, a car owner may need to get their car’s or pickup truck’s paint job fixed up, and this can be done at an auto shop as well if the car owner doesn’t have the equipment or skills to handle it alone. Some car enthusiasts, though, are known for effecting dent repair or paint touch-ups on their own a their private garages. So, what may cause a car owner to need dent repair or paint fixes?

Dents On the Car

Blunt trauma will put a dent onto a car, and this may be either due to the car itself moving, a moving object striking it, or even both. Minor auto accidents may put a dent in a person’s car, such as on the doors or bumpers, if the driver slowly backs up their car but then hits another vehicle, a fire hydrant, or some other hard object. This is likely to put a dent right there in the bumper. In other cases, a car may suffer a glancing blow against another vehicle in a minor collision, or another car’s drivers may hit the brakes but still have some speed left over when they hit another car. Such collisions won’t total the victim car, but they’re bound to at least put some dents in the car, which may be large and ugly. What’s more, those dents disrupt air flow around a car, slowing down its fuel efficiency. And in other cases, nature itself may put dents on the car. Large hail, such as hail pieces the size of golf balls, may fall and strike the car, putting dents all over its roof, hood, and trunk (known as the hood and bonnet in the UK). Or, a heavy tree branch may break loose and land on the car.

Dents can be fixed, however. In some cases, an entire door may be removed and replaced, but that may be a drastic step to take. More commonly, the car’s owner will take his or her vehicle to a nearby auto shop and ask the crews there to hammer out the dents. The professionals will use striking instruments to pound the car’s body back into shape and minimize the presence of those dents as asked. The end result may or may not look perfect compared to before the collision, but this can often be done to the customer’s satisfaction.

Paint

All cars come off the assembly line with a coat of paint and sealant, but trauma may damage the paint job. Here again, a scrape against another car or objects such as fire hydrants may scratch off some paint, leaving ugly marks on the car. Falling tree branches may scratch up a car’s paint, and sometimes, paint simply rusts with age. Vandalism is another threat, where vandals may deliberately drag a car or similar object across a car’s paint job to put ugly scratches on it.

A car owner may either take their car in to an auto shop and ask the crews to touch up the paint, or the owner may handle this alone if able. In this case, the car’s owner can open the hood and check the barrier between the engine and passenger compartments for a certain sticker that explains the car’s paint color code. The owner may then order this paint online, and once they get it, they can sand down the affected area, put down primer, then a few coats of paint. Once that dries and sealant is put on, the car may look as good as new. A car enthusiast may do this work in their own private garage to fix rust spots or scratches on their cars’ paint jobs.